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Author Topic: South Florida Anolis  (Read 2592 times)

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Offline Spaff

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South Florida Anolis
« on: August 07, 2013, 11:57:08 PM »
Here's a thread for the S. FL members...which species do you frequently encounter down there? Post pictures if you have them! I'm mostly talking about the invasives that have established themselves, but feel free to post any Anolis pictures you have.

Offline Rusty_Shackleford

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Re: South Florida Anolis
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2013, 09:40:45 AM »
Zach, I see more of non native species than native species every day. Bahamian anoles, and Cuban tree frogs mostly. I do have an Anolis carolinensis that hangs out on our lanai occasionally. Every night around sundown there is a parade of Cuban tree frogs that come out from their hiding places underneath the roof tiles to march to the Palmetto trees. Sometimes they actually do play leap frog over one another. The native green tree frogs are pretty rare here. Perhaps they are more prevalent around undisturned wild areas.
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Offline Spaff

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Re: South Florida Anolis
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2013, 10:28:02 AM »
Jon, thanks for your reply!

Thankfully, anoles are excellent niche partitioners. You see fewer Green Anoles likely because they've been driven into an arboreal lifestyle by the appearance of the other species. In the Bahamas or Cuba (don't remember which now), the Green Anoles evolved alongside Browns and others. The Browns were more adapted to the ground, whereas the Greens went into the trees and were successful. Others fit into the middle area between those two niches. In S. Florida, Bark Anoles (Anolis distichus) would most probably be found on tree trunks, taking advantage of the niche space between where Browns and Greens reside. Do you see many A. distichus? What about A. equestris? The A. equestris is the species that I could see do some real damage to the native Green Anoles since they will eat them.

Cuban Treefrogs are just bad. The niche partitioning in Anolis doesn't translate well to these tree frogs, and the reason you don't see as many Green Treefrogs is likely because they are outcompeted or possibly eaten(?). In my readings of Florida Invasive Biology, it does seem that wild areas have a greater native diversity. It seems that the invasives need disturbance to do their best.

Offline Ed

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Re: South Florida Anolis
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2013, 02:39:51 PM »
There is some good research that indicates that the niche that A. sagrei has a skewed predation rate on A. carolinensis juveniles which shifts the dynamics of the populations see for example http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s004420000414#page-1

This is important because hatchling A. carolinensis preferentially choose habitat close to the ground which is prime territory for brown anoles. The resulting increased predation on hatchling green anoles by brown anoles shifts recruitment and population stability against green anoles  (see http://www.faculty.biol.vt.edu/jenssen/pdfMS/1998_copeia_size_related_habitat_use.pdf for habitat preference of green anole hatchlings) even before we get into direct competition for resources.

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Offline markpulawski

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Re: South Florida Anolis
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2013, 04:50:34 AM »
I wish I could identify all of the anoles I see running around, some look so different from one another I assume they are different species. I was talking to Dennis at Tropiflora one day about how I thought all of these non natives had pushed out the green anoles that are rarely seen around my house and his opinion was that they had not, he said the green natives occupy a different niche and are more arborial which is the reason they are seen less often. My cat loves to grab a couple of brown every time he goes out by the pool, it doesn't bother me as it seems there are an endless supply of them.

 

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